Question: What are migrant workers in the 1930s?

The Great Depression and the Dust Bowl (a period of drought that destroyed millions of acres of farmland) forced white farmers to sell their farms and become migrant workers who traveled from farm to farm to pick fruit and other crops at starvation wages.

What was life like for migrant workers in 1930s?

Working conditions were often unsafe and unsanitary. Migrant workers had to follow the harvest of different crops, so they had to continue to pack up and move throughout California to find work. When the migrant workers weren’t working, they enjoyed recreational and social activities. Many sang and played instruments.

What is the purpose of migrant workers?

Many countries rely on migrant workers to help them plug their labour shortfalls, while migrants’ remittances provide a vital source of finance and foreign exchange for households and governments in their countries of origin. But the life of a migrant worker is often a harsh and isolated one.

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What would a typical day be like for a migrant worker in the 1930s?

The typical day for a migrant worker was very difficult they moved place to place looking for jobs. The workers asked to stay at a home but it always came with a price, the price was work. The workers had to do a job and once they were finished they could stay at the place for the night.

Why did people migrate in the 1930s?

The one-two punch of economic depression and bad weather put many farmers out of business. In the early 1930s, thousands of Dust Bowl refugees — mainly from Oklahoma, Texas, Colorado, Kansas, and New Mexico — packed up their families and migrated west, hoping to find work.

How many migrant workers were there in the 1930s?

The exact number of Dust Bowl refugees remains a matter of controversy, but by some estimates, as many as 400,000 migrants headed west to California during the 1930s, according to Christy Gavin and Garth Milam, writing in California State University, Bakersfield’s Dust Bowl Migration Archives.

What were the working conditions like for migrant workers?

Migrant workers were subjected to harsher working conditions and lower wages because people were desperate for work. Workers were replaceable. Too many people looking for work reduced living conditions. The migrant worker camps were primitive – no electricity and no indoor plumbing.

What jobs did migrant workers have in the 1930s?

The Great Depression and the Dust Bowl (a period of drought that destroyed millions of acres of farmland) forced white farmers to sell their farms and become migrant workers who traveled from farm to farm to pick fruit and other crops at starvation wages.

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Where did migrant workers come from in the 1930’s?

The migrants represented in Voices from the Dust Bowl came primarily from Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, and Missouri. Most were of Anglo-American descent with family and cultural roots in the poor rural South.

Who is considered a migrant worker?

A “migrant worker” is defined in the International Labour Organization (ILO) instruments as a person who migrates from one country to another (or who has migrated from one country to another) with a view to being employed other than on his own account, and includes any person regularly admitted as a migrant for …

Do migrant workers exist today where what kinds of jobs do they have?

What kind of jobs do they do? How is the issue of migrant workers significant today? They are found in the agricultural industry picking crops. Rely on them to pick our crops and cut our lawns because they work for less than nothing.

Where did most immigrants come from in the 1930s?

In the 1920s and 1930s, a large number of these immigrants set out West, with Detroit getting a large number of Middle Eastern immigrants, as well as many Midwestern areas where the Arabs worked as farmers.

How were migrant workers affected by the dust bowl?

California: The Promised Land

The arrival of the Dust Bowl migrants forced California to examine its attitude toward farm work, laborers, and newcomers to the state. The Okies changed the composition of California farm labor. They displaced the Mexican workers who had dominated the work force for nearly two decades.

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